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're going to delve into any type of serious reform on the tax or entitlement side or even a framework by christmas. oh, yeah. i guess i'm the tooth fairy. >> bill, so what do you do here with no fiscal cliff deal yet, with whispers of possibly the fed stimulating the economy even further, and with economic data pouring in almost daily that suggests we're still sputtering along? >> well, i tend to think 2013s going to be a great year. i'm not just looking at housing and employment. i'm looking at the architectural building index. there's stuff in the draw room. they're ready to bid out this winter and break ground in the spring. the republicans know that. the democrats know that. i would agree with rick. right now it's hard to imagine they can come up with something. we know they can. we know the democrats can say, okay, we'll give you something on means testing entitlements and we'll move the social security age up. republicans will say, we'll get rid of second mortgage deductions. they can do it. i don't think they really want to do it yet. so we just sit here sort of up 100, down 10
look at the relative yield, not only is there a tax advantage you're picking up significant yield. >> michael, what would you buy here? >> how about this, gold? let's bias sets where people will be nervous and flee to assets that give them some sense of comfort. i think gold will be a $2,000 an ounce trade sometime in the next 12 months. again, i also agree you need to buy -- you should not buy treasury. i think treasuries are a bubble waiting to burst. i like municipal bond trade. i like intermediate to short term average quality corporate bonds where you're not really paying so much for the high corporate quality rate. i think you can get better yields. as russ mentioned, absolutely, investors are going to have to have some money in fixed income. you can't set in cash at zero percent, it will kill you from an inflation point. >> i've been at cnbc since 1998. sing the piece of advice given over and over is whatever you do, don't buy the long end of the treasury curve because it's a bad investment. and yet it has been the greatest investment. at some point that's going to change,
on the fiscal cliff, chances are we get a slower economy next year because of the higher taxes and cutting spending? >> i want to touch on something that liz just said. i have tried to get her to play along with this game. >> i gave up long ago. >> she always resists me when i try to pin her down on the number. i guess she's smart. as you mentioned, a fellow from morgan stanley coming out saying, look, i blew it. it's a pain for me. i don't want to do this. i think what they're banking on is this whole fiscal cliff thing, the europe thing. all of the head winds for the market are never going to see the worst case scenario. i think just kind of the picture is this muddle through going forward. i called up today and tried to -- i talked to some of the most bearish people i know. they're all just kind of saying, yeah, we're going to muddle through. the fiscal cliff is going it get resolved one way or the other. europe is going to get resolve one way or the other. i think this is one of -- >> steve, he brings up a good point. consumers are not worried about the fiscal cliff. intraday trading t
a deal, there will be tax hikes and sped spending cuts which could be headwinds in itself. >> the market on a short term basis has been a little oversensitive to every tactical change in the likelihood of some kind of deal before the end of the year. it does not mean to me once we get an agreement or don't get an agreement that the market is automatically therefore more vulnerable. i actually think that essentially the 5% move we've had to the up side in the last week when congress started to express a mutual intention of getting something done, that probably gets most people to the idea of, fine, we hash out some compromise that both can maybe declare victory. if not, then soon thereafter. i do think though that you see decent domestic economic numbers underpinning a lot of what's going on below the surface in the market and the headwinds to me being the open question of whether china with reaction sell rate. to me those two things should be driving the market as opposed to kind of the war gaming of the fiscal cliff talks in d.c. >> todd, is this all about the fiscal cliff for you? let'
sundance kid, butch ka cassidy, when they jump over the cliff and they fell? the taxes are going to go up. interest rates are going to go up. nobody will be able to borrow any money. you can't buy a house. you're not going to be able to do anything that you want to do that you do today. as a result, that's what the cliff means. so if the government doesn't fix this issue and come together and get sane, then the bond markets are going to do it. what's a ten-year treasury now? 1.6 or something like that? it will go to 7%. buying a house will cost 10. it will cost 13 to do other things. you just won't be able to operate. >> you think this is going to be a market disruption, if, in fact, we go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. i don't think people appreciate the fact when you say cliff they think it's a movie. this is what's going to happen automatically. the depending stopping is not thoughtful. taxes going up by 600 billions is not thoughtful. it's an unthoughtful thing brought about by laws in the past. >> which is why you joined this fix the debt campaign? >> absolutely. it's insane n
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5